Acculturation and drug use disorders among Hispanics in the U.S.

Carlos Blanco, Carmen Morcillo, Margarita Alegría, María Cecilia Dedios, Pablo Fernández -Navarro, Rosa Regincos, Shuai Wang

Producción científica: Contribución a una revistaArtículorevisión exhaustiva

56 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

The authors' objective was to examine the relationship between degree of acculturation across five different dimensions of acculturation and risk of drug use disorders (DUD) among US Hispanics.Data were derived from a large national sample of the US adult population, the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, collected using face-to-face interviews. The sample included civilian non-institutionalized U.S. population aged 18 years and older, with oversampling of Hispanics, Blacks and those aged 18-24 years. Interviews of more than 34,000 adults were conducted during 2004-2005 using the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule - DSM-IV Version. A total of 6359 subjects who identified themselves as Hispanics were included in this study. Acculturation measures used in this study assessed:, time spent in the U.S., age at immigration, language preference, social network composition, and ethnic identification.Among Hispanics, there was an inverse relationship between five complementary dimensions of acculturation and DUD. Moreover, this relationship showed a significant gradient across all acculturation dimensions and DUD.The prevalence of DUD increases with acculturation in Hispanics, across several measures of acculturation in a dose-response relationship. Hispanic cultural features and values exert a protective effect on risk of DUD. Preservation and promotion of Hispanic values may be an important component of preventive interventions for Hispanics. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
Idioma originalEspañol
Páginas (desde-hasta)226-232
Número de páginas7
PublicaciónJournal of Psychiatric Research
Volumen47
EstadoPublicada - 1 ene. 2013
Publicado de forma externa

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