Relationship between technology acceptance model, self-regulation strategies, and academic self-efficacy with academic performance and perceived learning among college students during remote education

Ricardo Navarro, Vanessa Vega, Hugo Bayona, Victor Bernal, Arlis Garcia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between the technology acceptance model, self-regulation strategies, and academic self-efficacy with academic performance and perceived learning among college students during remote education. Methods: The participants were 301 university students from Lima. Structural equation model was used to test the proposed theoretical relationships between the variables. On the one hand, the study sought to explore the relationship between academic self-efficacy and self-regulation strategies with the technology acceptance model. On the other hand, it sought to determine whether the three dimensions of the technology acceptance model are positively related to perceived learning and academic performance. Results: The results suggest the importance of improving psychological variables such as self-efficacy and self-regulation strategies to improve the acceptance of technology, which would also improve the academic performance and perceived learning of students in a virtual environment. Discussion: The discussion highlights the significance of self-efficacy and metacognitive strategies in influencing technology perception and attitudes, ultimately impacting perceived learning and academic performance in virtual education.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1227956
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
Volume14
DOIs
StatePublished - 2023

Keywords

  • academic performance
  • engagement
  • perceived learning
  • remote education
  • self-efficacy
  • technology acceptance

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