Introducing a degrowth approach to the circular economy policies of food production, and food loss and waste management: Towards a circular bioeconomy

Daniel Hoehn, Jara Laso, María Margallo, Israel Ruiz‐salmón, Francisco José Amo‐setién, Rebeca Abajas‐bustillo, Carmen Sarabia, Ainoa Quiñones, Ian Vázquez‐rowe, Alba Bala, Laura Batlle‐bayer, Pere Fullana‐i‐palmer, Rubén Aldaco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

There is a growing debate surrounding the contradiction between an unremitting increase in the use of resources and the search for environmental sustainability. Therefore, the concept of sustainable degrowth is emerging aiming to introduce in our societies new social values and new policies, capable of satisfying human requirements whilst reducing environmental impacts and consumption of resources. In this framework, circular economy strategies for food production and food loss and waste management systems, following the Sustainable Development Goals agenda, are being developed based on a search for circularity, but without setting limits to the continual increase in environmental impacts and resource use. This work presents a methodology for determining the percentage of degrowth needed in any food supply chain, by analyzing four scenarios in a life cycle assessment approach over time between 2020 and 2040. Results for the Spanish case study sug-gested a degrowth need of 26.8% in 2015 and 58.9% in 2040 in order to achieve compliance with the Paris Agreement targets, highlighting the reduction of meat and fish and seafood consumption as the most useful path.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3379
JournalSustainability (Switzerland)
Volume13
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2 Mar 2021

Keywords

  • Circular bioeconomy
  • Degrowth
  • Food loss and waste
  • Food supply chain
  • Global North
  • Paris agreement
  • Spiral bioeconomy

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