Exploring the Quotidian: An Analysis of Plain-Weave Textiles at Cerro de Oro, Peru, during the Sixth to Tenth Centuries

Francesca Fernandini Parodi, Rosa María Varillas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Andean prehispanic textiles are renown for being complex masterpieces made with labor-intensive techniques and high-quality raw materials. Nevertheless, the vast majority of textiles, those used by the population at large, were plain, simple, and without any decoration. We study a sample composed of the most common textiles used by people living at Cerro de Oro in the Cañete Valley, Peru. Our analysis focuses on fiber selection, yarn thickness, and the presence of errors throughout the process of weaving. We discuss relevant aspects of the social process of textile production, such as the role played by plain-weave textiles in different contexts, their use in different types of garments, and the varied ways community members, with particular skill levels, participated in clothing the living and the dead at Cerro de Oro.

Original languageEnglish
JournalLatin American Antiquity
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 19 May 2023

Keywords

  • Cerro de Oro
  • community
  • crafts
  • plain-weave textiles
  • quotidian
  • textiles

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